The efficacy of Pain Neuroscience Education (PNE), the explanation of pain to patients with (long-term) pain, has been studied since 2002 (Moseley, 2002).
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A vlog by Prof. Roselien Pas
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Save the Date! Pain Science in Motion IV will be held in Maastricht, the Netherlands (27-28 May 2021)
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A vlog by Prof. Jo Nijs
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Some days ago, my car made an uncomfortable sound and I immediately thought ‘something is wrong with my right front wheel’. I went to the garage and told them what, in my opinion, was wrong with my car.
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Physical activity is known to play an important key role in the treatment of pain conditions and is an effective strategy to relieve pain and improve level of functioning in daily activities in various chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders (Daenen, et al., 2015).
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The development of chronic pain is the one of the most seen sequelae in the cancer survivor population (Leysen et al., 2017). But despite that, it is an entity which is poorly studied and comprehended (Burton et al., 2007).
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One world, one education?   April 7th, 2019
Increasing research all over the world is indicating the importance of giving pain neuroscience education to chronic pain patients (Malfliet et al. 2018). Results have indicated an increase in the level of knowledge of the patient and a decrease of in the level of perceived threat, consequently increasing the quality of life.
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Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women worldwide. Despite the high incidence in Western countries, an increase in survival and life expectancy has been observed due to the ongoing improvement of detection method accuracy, early diagnosis and breast cancer treatment (Ferlay et aL., 2015).
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There is growing evidence that a state of heightened sensitivity of central pain processing pathways is present in chronic pain patients. Hyperexcitability at the spinal level can be assessed by experimentally inducing a nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) of the lower limb.
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Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) is among the most common accident-related disorders (about 300 per 10.000 inhabitants in western countries) that have extensive consequences for patients, healthcare services and insurance companies (Tournier et al. 2016).
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Chronic musculoskeletal pain is one of the conditions responsible for the increase in the number of years lived with disability, absenteeism and health care costs in the world (Andrew et al. 2014, G. B. D 2017).
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The World Congress on Pain 2018, organized by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) was held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. This meeting focused on sharing new developments in pain research, treatment, and education.
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“Pain is in the brain” is no longer a novel statement in the field of pain research, but can be regarded as one of the main pillars of most recent thinking models about pain in the last decades.
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Successfully alleviating pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) or in patients with persisting pain after a total knee replacement (TKR) remains a huge challenge.
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Sleep regulation: an important issue?   November 29th, 2018
Sleep problems are frequently seen in several chronic pain populations.
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Neck pain represents one of the most frequent musculoskeletal disorders, with a huge impact in terms of health-care costs and it is the fourth leading cause of disability.
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For effective treatment of non-specific neck pain, physiotherapists should be able to rely on the evidence from scientific research. However, scientific research evidence is poorly integrated in physiotherapy. One possible cause for this poor integration is that RCTs do not reflect “the real world” of physiotherapy clinical reasoning.
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The area of rehabilitation research for patients having persistent pain is on the move. The rapid growth in pain science has inspired rehabilitation clinicians and researchers around the globe.
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Sex differences in pain have been a topic of increased interest in recent years. An expansive body of literature in this area clearly suggests that men and women differ in their response to pain. Controlled laboratory studies have revealed overwhelming evidence for increased pain sensitivity, higher pain ratings and lower pain tolerance of female participants compared with males, although the size of the differences were modest and not always statistically significant (Rosen et al., 2017).
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The following blog will discuss the difference between ‘sensitivity’ and ‘sensitization’ and how this might relate to central sensitization pain.
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Het zonnetje schijnt en de zaal is vol! Ondanks alle verleidingen buiten is er aan het mooie bankgebouw van BNP Paribas Fortis aan de Meir een grote groep kinesitherapeuten/fysiotherapeuten, artsen, afgevaardigden van patiëntenverenigingen en onderzoekers samen gekomen om de laatste inzichten over pijnrevalidatie met elkaar te delen.
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JOIN US AT PAIN SCIENCE IN MOTION! May 31 – June 2, 2019 in Savona, Italy
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Although evidence on psychosocial factors affecting the prognosis after rotator cuff repairs is scarce, a recent systematic review (Coronado et al., 2018) reported that preoperative patient expectation is an important predictor of patient-reported outcomes in patients after rotator cuff surgery.
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The scientific committee is proud to announce the program for the Pain, Mind & Movement ‘Applying Science to the Clinic’ Satellite Meeting of the 17th World Congress on Pain.
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