For centuries chronic pain has been viewed as a solely biomedical issue in the tissues. However, times are changing and we now know that (chronic) pain is a complex construct in which not only physiological factors play a role. In addition, pain is influenced by psychological factors, such as thoughts and feelings, and social factors, for instance judgement and misunderstanding.
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The biomedical model falls short in explaining chronic pain. Although many clinicians have moved on in their thinking and apply a broad biopsychosocial view with regard to chronic pain (patients), the majority of clinicians (including myself) have received a biomedical-focused (undergraduate) training/education.
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It is well established that pain has the function of maintaining the integrity of the body. Pain is an evolutionarily acquired alarm signal of bodily threat and this phylogenetic function is extremely important for survival.
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Lage rugpijn blijft één van de duurste en meest invaliderende problemen van onze Westerse samenleving. Logisch dus dat voor vele stakeholders (patiënten, paramedici, artsen, firma’s en overheden) de focus hierop ligt.
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Jaarlijks worden enkele duizenden patiënten geopereerd voor lage rugpijn met uitstraling naar het been (lumbale radiculopathie). Onderzoek wijst uit dat 23-28% postoperatief chronische pijn zullen ontwikkelen.
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